Commercial Architecture: Flat vs Pitched Roof Designs

Commercial Architecture: Flat vs Pitched Roof Designs

From Pixabay

Whether it’s a retail store, an office or any other kind of commercial building project, one of the most common stumbling blocks for architects and business owners is deciding on the kind of roof they’re going to use. Though it’s rarely the most visible or impressive feature of a building, it’s still very important to choose a roof design that’s a good fit for the project’s budget and needs. Here, we’ll take a closer look at the two most common roof designs: flat and pitched roofs.

Flat Roof Designs

Commercial Architecture: Flat vs Pitched Roof Designs

From Wikimedia

The first thing to understand about “flat” roofs is that they’re not 100% flat! In order to make sure rainwater drains away, there needs to be at least a slight pitch. If the property you’re working on is set to be particularly small, or you’re just building an extension to a larger building like a garage or other storage area, a flat roof design is generally the best option. This kind of roof is usually much easier to erect than a pitched roof, as the horizontal structure can be securely fastened to the ceiling joints just underneath. After that, a layer of single ply membrane or some weatherproof roofing felt can be stretched over the top and secured. When you’re looking at prices for roof coverings, just bear in mind that it will have a massive impact on the overall lifespan of your building. Before putting any money down, make sure you’re doing a little research into the different kinds of single ply roofing and adhesives. When it comes to any budgeting concerns, flat roof designs are almost always more cost-effective than pitched roofs. The price of materials, along with what you have to pay for labor costs, will always be much lower when building a flat roof.

Pitched Roof Designs

Commercial Architecture: Flat vs Pitched Roof Designs

From Wikimedia

Pitched roofs are formed of at least two slopes, built to rise up and meet in the center to create a peak. Ask any commercial roofer, and they’ll tell you that pitched roof designs are known for their longevity, natural aesthetic value, and flexibility. While pitched designs are generally more associated with domestic properties, they’re still a very viable option when it comes to commercial design. Due to the shape of this kind of construction, pitched roof designs can provide additional space, which can be a hugely attractive feature on smaller commercial properties. Furthermore, because of the waterproofing, added insulation and durability that will be provided to the spaces below, pitched roofs also have a much longer lifespan than flat designs. Another big advantage to pitched roof designs is that they’ll usually mesh better with the surrounding landscape, and be less of an eyesore compared to conventional office designs. Sloped roofs blend in better with surrounding buildings and architecture wherever they’re erected, so you won’t have to worry about your business or client being associated with some ugly, brutalist block. The main drawback of pitched roofs is that the added complexity in their design and construction means greater investment in materials and labor is required.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Get more stuff like this
in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list and get interesting stuff and updates to your email inbox.